U2 Jams With Pearl Jam's Eddie Vedder and Mumford & Sons

05-16-2017
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U2

U2 had a special treat for fans during their concert in Seattle on Sunday night (May 14th) when they were joined on stage by Pearl Jam frontman Eddie Veddar and Mumford & Sons.

They joined the veteran Irish band for a special Mother's Day performance of the song "Mothers of the Disappeared," which is track from U2's blockbuster 1987 album "The Joshua Tree".

Radio,com reports that U2 frontman Bono asked fans at the Centurylink Field venue, "Where's Eddie Vedder? Spirit of Seattle, spirit of Chicago, spirit of America. Where's Eddie?"

The Pearl Jam then singer came out from backstage to take over lead vocals for the popular Joshua Tree track. U2 invited their opening act, Mumford & Sons, to provide harmony for the track's closing verses. Watch the video here.

Radio.com is an official news provider for antiMusic.com.
Copyright Radio.com/CBS Local - Excerpted here with permission.

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