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Fiach Moriarty - The Revolution


by Kevin Wierzbicki

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Contrary to the sentiment of Gil Scott-Heron's 1970 album, here Fiach Moriarty sings that "The revolution will be televised." To be sure The Revolution will garner its share of radio airtime as Moriarty offers up here a set of catchy pop tunes like the title cut and modern folk numbers like "The Mother," a quiet reflection of a mother losing her sons to conscription set to delicately-picked acoustic guitar. Moriarty is back to a pop sound, using ringing guitars, chiming keys and layered vocals on "Don't Want to Let You Down," a sunny song that surprises a bit by ending suddenly right when the chorus and groove really hit their stride, a classic technique that leaves the listener wanting more. Moriarty is from Dublin, Ireland but most American listeners will not be able to discern an accent; likely that'll be the furthest thing from their minds while bopping along to the effervescent, Matchbox 20-like "Raindrops" or chilling to "Oil and Water," a jazzy and mellow duet with fellow Irish singer Wallis Bird. The collateral damage of war is a recurring theme throughout The Revolution and Moriarty ends the record with "Won't Lay Down," a folk tune that is ultimately disrupted with loud, dissonant keyboards, perhaps mirroring how peacetime can turn to deadly chaos without a moment's notice. Listeners don't need to hear the message here to enjoy The Revolution though; Moriarty has a wonderful voice and has crafted here an excellent venue to showcase it.

Order your copy here.

Fiach Moriarty - The Revolution
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